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Bible Version News

1 min read

From Way of Life's Friday Church News Notes for 22 July 2018

KING JAMES BIBLE STILL THE PREFERRED TRANSLATION IN AMERICA (Friday Church News Notes, June 22, 2018, www.wayoflife.org, fbns@wayoflife.org, 866-295-4143) - The 2015 Barna State of the Bible survey found that the King James Bible remains the preferred Bible version among Americans by far. It is the preferred Bible by 39% of those surveyed. After that is the New International Version (NIV), at 13%, and the New King James (NKJV), at 10%. These numbers have remained consistent since 2012. There is a significant difference when it comes to age groups. Among Boomers (age 50-68), 43% prefer the KJV; among Gen-Xers (age 31-49), 41%; but among Millennials (age 16-30), it is 28%. Still, the King James Bible is the preferred translation among all age groups over the New International Version, which is the next favorite. This information is from “State of the Bible 2015,” www.americanbible.org/uploads/content/State_of_the_Bible_2015_report.pdf

Creative Commons and Attribution

1 min read

Last week, I received an interesting email from someone asking me to change the attribution on one of the pictures I had used. 

Here's the article:  http://www.maxsons.org/2014/01/17/american-culture-and-the-media 
Here's the image I used:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/87735223@N02/11359245033/

All of my own images are published with a creative commons license and I'm totally for the idea that the person gets to control what happens with their stuff; however, I think it is a step too far to use that to drive traffic to a website as opposed to a simple attribution.

Today at .@TheVyneNT

1 min read

IMG_20180106_144350

So yesterday we went to .@TheVyneNT.  In addition to going up on the roof to see it being redone, we went into the house.  I was trying to take a photosphere in this room because I thought it was cool. 

The room steward saw me and said something like Sir, you aren't alowed to video in here.  I said to her something like, Ok.  Thanks, but I'm not videoing.  I carried on trying to complete the photo sphere.  I got one more picture in and she said something like "Sir, you must stop.  There is no videoing here.  It is against the law."  I said but I'm not videoing and continued.  She more insistantly made another comment so I again said I wasn't videoing.  This time though, I asked her if she wanted to see.  She said yes so I let my camera compile the partial photo sphere and showed her.  Her reaction "Oh".  

So, yeah.  The rest of the day Cyndi and I joked about it.  So...remember:

"There's no videoing in here"

Cool and Creamy Pumpkin Pie

1 min read

2 cups canned pumpkin

1 carton cool whip*

1 box (4 serving size) instant vanilla pudding mix*

1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tst ginger, 1/8 tsp cloves, 1/8 tsp nutmeg)

1 graham cracker crust

 

Combine pumpkin and 1/2 of the cool whip, pudding mix, and spice

mix on low fot 1-2 min

spread onto crust and top with remaining cool whip

refigerate

 

To make cool whip:

take 8

#Sourdough

3 min read

IMG_20170416_081821

I'm sure I'll be asked in the future about my bread.  I've been asked in the past.  So, to avoid writing it up, yet again, I thought I'd make a post here with how I do it and can just link to it here.  So, here we go...

But first...there's no commercial yeast in this bread.  It raises itself using a starter.  I used this recipie as a starting point for my bread...I forget where I figured out how to make my starter.

Starting the Starter:

You'll need about a week to make this and get this going.  To start the starter, you'll be better off using organic type flour.  I've had really really good luck with rye flour.  The first time, my starter was 100% rye...this time, I started it to day 3 with rye flour and then switched to ordinary white flour.

  • Day 1 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 1 pm - mix
  • Day 2 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 2 pm - mix
  • Day 3 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 3 pm - mix

By this point you ought to see some bubbling in the starter.  If not, keep going.

  • Day 4 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 4 pm - mix
  • Day 5 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 5 pm - mix

By this time, it ought to be really going.  If it is, time to switch to maintenance mode.  The stiffer you keep your starter, the stronger the bread will be.  You can leave out the water if it starts to feel too liquidy.  I'd say you want to shoot for something about like cake mix.

Maintaining the starter:

What you do here depends on how often you want to make bread.  I usually feed my starter 2x per week.  When I feed it, I give it 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Like with creating it, if you want it stiffer, just leave off some of the water.  I'd keep this in the fridge.  You can even stretch the feeding to 1x per week or more.

Making the bread:

There's two steps to this:  getting the starter ready and then making the bread.  You'll need to do this in two steps.

Step 1 - get the starter ready:

  • mix 1 cup starter, 1 cup water, 1 cup flour together
  • feed your remaining starter (1/3 c flour and 1/3 cup water) and return to the fridge
  • Let sit overnight

Step 2 - make the bread

  • Take the mixture from step 1
  • add 1 tbsp salt
  • add flour to make a bread dough consistancy (dunno...about 2-4 cups more)
  • knead
  • Put into loaf pans (or you can let it rise in an oiled bowl lined with cornmeal)
  • Bake until done (about 30 min @ 350F or so)

You'll know it is done because it sounds hollow.  Let it cool and eat.

 

Sourdough Bread

3 min read

IMG_20170416_081821

I'm sure I'll be asked in the future about my bread.  I've been asked in the past.  So, to avoid writing it up, yet again, I thought I'd make a post here with how I do it and can just link to it here.  So, here we go...

But first...there's no commercial yeast in this bread.  It raises itself using a starter.  I used this recipie as a starting point for my bread...I forget where I figured out how to make my starter.

Starting the Starter:

You'll need about a week to make this and get this going.  To start the starter, you'll be better off using organic type flour.  I've had really really good luck with rye flour.  The first time, my starter was 100% rye...this time, I started it to day 3 with rye flour and then switched to ordinary white flour.

  • Day 1 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 1 pm - mix
  • Day 2 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 2 pm - mix
  • Day 3 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 3 pm - mix

By this point you ought to see some bubbling in the starter.  If not, keep going.

  • Day 4 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 4 pm - mix
  • Day 5 am - 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Mix.
  • Day 5 pm - mix

By this time, it ought to be really going.  If it is, time to switch to maintenance mode.  The stiffer you keep your starter, the stronger the bread will be.  You can leave out the water if it starts to feel too liquidy.  I'd say you want to shoot for something about like cake mix.

Maintaining the starter:

What you do here depends on how often you want to make bread.  I usually feed my starter 2x per week.  When I feed it, I give it 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup water.  Like with creating it, if you want it stiffer, just leave off some of the water.  I'd keep this in the fridge.  You can even stretch the feeding to 1x per week or more.

Making the bread:

There's two steps to this:  getting the starter ready and then making the bread.  You'll need to do this in two steps.

Step 1 - get the starter ready:

  • mix 1 cup starter, 1 cup water, 1 cup flour together
  • feed your remaining starter (1/3 c flour and 1/3 cup water) and return to the fridge
  • Let sit overnight

Step 2 - make the bread

  • Take the mixture from step 1
  • add 1 tbsp salt
  • add flour to make a bread dough consistancy (dunno...about 2-4 cups more)
  • knead
  • Put into loaf pans (or you can let it rise in an oiled bowl lined with cornmeal)
  • Bake until done (about 30 min @ 350F or so)

You'll know it is done because it sounds hollow.  Let it cool and eat.

 

modern-day witch doctor

1 min read

Being a techie is like being a modern version of a voodoo witch doctor who knows how to make zombies using fish poison

from https://insights.hpe.com/content/hpe-nxt/en/articles/2017/08/how-to-never-deal-with-users-again.html

 

I've never really thought about it in that way before today.